Sunday, May 3, 2015

The Second World War Ended Seventy Years Ago

    Readers will be thinking that I'm on a roll as far as posts on war is concerned.

     A  number of things have come together at the same time to make this post more meaningful.   I was born in October of 1939 so it was a few days after the war started. I remember small bits of the war from the experience of a young child. We saw many soldiers. Our farm was near a training airport so planes flew over all day. As  a child I was very interested in planes so I stopped to watch each plane. Some of our uncles were overseas so Mom sent many parcels and I remember watching the packing of the parcels. I remember news reports and it seemed like all they said was German, German, German. We did not get what the message was. 

    After the war many people came back and the war was a common topic. Some things about the war were taught in school. There were ceremonies to mark some of the points of the war.

    As an adult I've read a few books on the Second World War. I've read a couple of biographies about Hitler. 

    Right now I'm reading a biography of Matthew Halton, who was a major war correspondent. He was also carried by the United States news. This biography covers the period before the war and some of the things that lead to the war. The major battles were covered. Halton moved across North Africa and then up Italy. Later he was there for the liberation of Paris and Holland. This has brought back many parts of the war.

    So when remembrances are made on the end of the war I  just happened to be reading about it's history. Major remembrances were made in Holland as Canadian forces were key in liberating Holland. Canadian veterans always remember the kindness of the Dutch people. 

    So I had to take a few moments and post about a major historical event as I was reading about it when the remembrances took place.

     Dispatches from the Front is a very good read. It's written by David Halton, who is the son of Matthew Halton.


Cadets


    

35 comments:

  1. I must start reading history books again. I usually enjoy them.

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    1. I also like historical fiction.

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  2. Yes, seventy years ago, and slowly people are conveniently forgetting of all that happened . .......... with all thats happening all over the globe right now, lets hope and pray that things don't turn from bad to worse.

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    1. Those who have direct experience and memories are quickly disappearing.

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  3. What a terrible time that was. Thank goodness it eventually ended. If only wars could end for good; that would be my wish for this world.

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    1. The casualties were unbelievable.

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  4. I met a fellow who graduated college in 1936 and took a year touring Germany on a bicycle.

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    1. Halton also spent time in Germany in the 30's.

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  5. I remember my Mom worked in the factory that made heavy clothing for the soldiers - she was single then and her and her friends put their addresses in the pockets of all the coats of the soldiers, wishing them luck and safely home. There was quite a bit of correspondence written back and forth.....hence my Mom meeting my Father. There was a lovely Dutch Lady that was a friend of my Moms and when the Holland was declared free they danced out on the street like everybody else - as I remember the story.I shall check out "Dispatches from the front", as my Dad was a dispatcher. Thank you Red.

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    1. There are millions of stories like your Mom's all unique and valuable.

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  6. My hubby reads about war a lot! His father was there as a soldier, and liberated one of the death camps. It changed him forever.

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    1. Your key point is that they were changed forever.

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  7. Those are surely good reads. Wanna know what was happening in China those years, during Japanese occupation? You may want to read "The Rape of Nanking". It's mind-blowing, devastating account on what people were capable of doing. It won't leave you feeling good but a thing worth knowing.

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    1. I'll put this book on my list. Thanks.

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  8. good that the son would write about his father's experiences. i'm sure it is a powerful book.

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    1. The son was also a news reporter.

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  9. I've just discovered Foley's War on Netflix, set in England during the World War II. It's a mystery show but very delightful, and I've learned a great deal about things I knew little of, like Dunkirk and the private boats that ferried wounded personnel back to safety. I read plenty about it on the Internet which is a really great resource. :-)

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    1. I also read a lot of historical fiction and like it. Try the Kings of Ireland.

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  10. That book sounds like a good "read".

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    1. I was surprised by this story.

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  11. I should read more about World War II. One of my Uncles was wounded in Africa ...he lived without a heel and with many wounds. The other was killed and is buried in Italy. My Grandmother was deeply sad:(

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    1. With all the casualties it's hard to understand how people coped with their grief.

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  12. I was watching the televised ceremonies. There are as you know many moving facts about Canadian boys becoming men and their acts of heroism and bravery. The relationship between the Dutch people and Canadians is a lasting one.

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    1. A large percentage of them were 18 year olds.

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  13. And of course this week marks the centennial of the sinking of the Lusitania during the First World War. Halton's time as a correspondent on the front is mentioned in the War Museum.

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    1. Halton had a style that was descriptive . was the first to use tape and send the sounds of war to the listeners.

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  14. Anything about WWII makes fascinating reading.

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    1. I have not read much on WW II lately.

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  15. Oh darn, that sounds like a really good read but I have so many books waiting to be read that it is starting to intimidate me! I will make a note of it, though.

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    1. It's always handy to have a list of books to read.

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  16. I've read lots of biographies and memoirs from WWII and have always had a fascination for that time in history. It's interesting that you have personal memories from that time. My parents married right after the war ended, when my dad returned home from Asia. He never talked about it, but my grandparents had lots of stories from the war years.

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  17. Many men did not talk about their experiences. I have a 90 year old friend and every year around remembrance he has lots to share.

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  18. We've been a fortunate generation: not having to fight a war on our own soil (terrorism excepted) and we've not been conscripted to fight elsewhere.

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  19. A very interesting read Red. I grew up with stories from my Mom - Dad didn't talk about it much - of the times she spent in the air raid shelters and how she was a warden and part of her job was to knock on people's doors if the black-out curtains weren't pulled tightly enough. Last year I spent the 70th Commemoration of D-Day in Normandy with my father-in-law who is 94 years old. It was a once in a lifetime experience for all of us. Now I am meeting up with my niece soon who lives in Germany with her husband. I have many friends in Germany now and now a German nephew-in-law. We have talked about WWII history together, with him bringing the subject up as I am always sensitive to people’s feelings in that area. We have a very good heart to heart of what it was like for our families. Both my husband and I are very interested in history, and WWII history. I love to learn about history of any kind, more so as I get older than ever before.

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  20. Somehowe I missed your post about WWII. It seems the older I get the more I am interested and touched by the stories of the war. In this time of the year there were many documenteries and storytelling programs on tv and I watched them all. It all seems so short ago, I am of the second generation and my parents have gone through all the misery of 5 years war. I still amazes me that all the troops from other continents came to Europe to fight for our freedom and so many lost their lives to give us a better life.

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