Wednesday, January 13, 2021

EMIL KLINE 2

     Dad worked around the Vernon, British Columbia area for about 5 years. In 1935 he was 22 years old. 

      For some reason he was not happy being a Lutheran. He was searching for something else and I don't think he knew what he was looking for. Somehow or other he found the Plymouth Brethern or they found him. He joined them and worshipped with them the remainder of his life.

     In 1935 he came back to his home in Esk, Saskatchewan. He bought a small farm. Where he got the money from to buy the farm I have no idea. His oldest sister came back with him and they farmed the summer of 1935. It may have been his sister's money that was used to buy  the farm. He went away in the winter to work at Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. 


     The young farmer

     He came back in the spring of 1936 to his farm. He had four horses but they were left out for the winter. In the spring he had to find his horses. Most farmers let their horses go for the winter and there would be huge horse herds in the area. 

     Love found my Dad in 1937. He married Mom in Feb. 1938. Many weddings were very small so they were married in her Mom's house.


     Wedding photo

     In February they went back to Dad's little house on the farm. They travelled by train and a friend met them and took them home. The next day Dad went over and started a fire in the house and they moved in with the few wedding presents they had. 

     The story was always the same. They had $60.00 and that had to last until September when they would have some grain to sell. So Dad promptly lost his wallet in the field with the $60.00 in it. They looked for hours. On the way back to the house Mom found the wallet. 

     From that time on they stayed on the farm.

     Another surprise happened in 1939 when I was born. 

     The war started and slowly Dad expanded with farming and the grain prices increased. 

      Another surprise happened in Oct. 1940 when my brother was born. My sister was born in 1942.

     They had a very small house and it was in very poor shape. Another boy was born in 1942.   

32 comments:

  1. I think that's the thing that just amazes me. We own one of the oldest houses in our little town. It is from the 1830s. Now that we know what we are looking for, you can pretty much see what the original town looked like (the nearest house to it still standing is about six blocks away). They all have rock foundations, hand dug cellars, and they were a story and a half dwelling, tiny places. Easier to heat. The original family in that house had sixchildren. We think they must have hung them on hooks at bedtime.

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  2. Hello,
    Great photos of your Mom and Dad. Thanks for sharing your family's story. Take care, enjoy your day!

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    1. It's interesting to see them when they were young.

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  3. Wonderful history, hard times but love prevailed! I would love to see the joy when she found the wallet! Whew, that was a close one!

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    1. It was a story they told over and over again.

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  4. You and your siblings were all "surprises". I guess your mum and dad were never taught the basics of human reproduction. By the way - do you know what your father did at Portage la Prairie? And did he get his horses back?

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    1. Okay we were not surprises!!! My Dad worked on cutting and packing ice that was used in the summer. Yes, you always get your horses back. These were tough little horses that did well on the prairie grass. Horses paw down through the snow to get to the grass.

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  5. Your Dad had a fancy pompadour in his wedding picture - my Dad had the same style hair for his wedding (1948). Four children in a small house, did you all share one bedroom? I am always amazed at how large some homes are now especially when there are often smaller families these days!

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    1. The kids had one bedroom and three slept in the same bed.

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  6. Love the photos. One can imagine the panic for your parents when you dad lost his wallet. Nightmare!

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    1. It's a story they told over and over again.

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  7. Wonderful story, beautiful wedding photo. Your father looked like a tall man in the photo.

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    1. Dad was 6' 1" but also had the big shoulders and long arms.

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  8. Your Dad has an interesting history! I didn't know that farmers let their horses go in the winter. Was it just too expensive and difficult to house and feed them all winter? I'm surprised they could find food on their own in that climate. I can only imagine how difficult those winters must have been!

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    1. You're right that farmers didn't want to look after the horses all winter. Western horses did well on native prairie grass. They would paw through the snow to get at the grass. Only about half of the land had been developed for farming so there was lots of grass.

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  9. It's good to know one's family history. Your parents saw a lot I'm sure, as did their parents.

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  10. I got a little bit confused at first, but think I’ve got it figured out now. In the first paragraph you mentioned that Emil worked around Vernon, BC for 5 years. So that must have started when he was about 17 years old? Again, in first paragraph: “In 1935 he was 22 years old.”

    In the third paragraph, in ’35, he returned to Esk. He met your mom in ’37, and they got married in ’38. So he was about 25 years old when he got married. And then you were born in ’39. I think I’ve got that straight now. :-)

    Here is my question: “Most farmers let their horses go for the winter and there would be huge horse herds in the area.” Wow, this amazes me. Farmers let their horses go for the winter? Could this be true? Reason I ask: I’ve known friends with horses in Montana and the upkeep for horses in the winter is continuous and expensive. They need lots of hay that has to be brought in … bales of it. They need access to fresh water. So, as important as the horses were to the farmers, it is hard to imagine they would just turn them out for the winter, especially in a northern location like that.

    I like the part of the story about the wallet. That would be a scary scenario to imagine your money was lost in the snow. Of course, the good thing, if you could make it through the winter, you would probably be able to find the wallet when the snow cleared in the spring. :-)

    Nice work on the continuing story.

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    1. I'm out by a year as Dad was 23 in 1935.You've got everything right. It's true about the horses. These were tough horses and did well on the prairie grass. They pawed through the snow to get to the grass. Snow provided the water. Horses today take care and need feed and water as they don't know how to fend for themselves. In the spring you'd find a large herd of horses and see that yours were in the herd. Patient calling of your horses would usually get them out of the herd. On first calling them they'd look at you and stay with the herd. Gradually they would come to you and you'd put a halter on one and the rest would follow.

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    2. Hi Red, First of all thank you for the reply ... this is fascinating. This is an excellent example of pioneer life that most of us don't know about and couldn't even imagine. Secondly, I've got to say how great it is that you reply to comments on your blog. I can only think of two bloggers who consistently do that ... you and Eileen over at Viewing Nature with Eileen. I've tried to do it in the past, but it just takes a lot of time and requires dedication. So, I say give yourself a pat-on-the-back. Have a good weekend and say HI to the Micro Manager.

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  11. We all have wonderful histories. Good your is written down.

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  12. What a scare that must have been, losing a wallet.

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  13. Yes, they told the story over and over again.

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  14. I am enjoying reading your family history.

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  15. I really enjoy reading your family history. What great stories of their early lives.

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  16. These are such great photos! And so are your stories.

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  17. I am late in commenting on these stories of your family history, Red, but they have been enjoyable. The part in this post about $60 having to last so long and then your father lost his wallet (then found by your mom) was interesting because it seems like such a small sum of money to last for so many months.

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  18. What great photos and history! I can only imagine how upset he was losing his wallet. Good series Red!

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  19. I really enjoyed reading about your family story, Red. I felt the relief when your mom found the wallet.

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