Wednesday, June 3, 2015

A Visit With the Owls

      I belong to the Red Deer River Naturalists (RDRN) which is a group dedicated to all things about natural history in the Red Deer river basin.

     We have just completed a project to produce a birding trail map for Central Alberta. It was a huge project but well worth the money and effort. We learned much from the experience. We had done a birding trail map for the city of Red Deer a couple of years earlier. 

     The next step in the process is to set up a website that allows you to copy one particular section of the map such as Dry Island Buffalo Jump .

    Last Sunday was the day we chose to show our new map off to the press and get some local publicity. 

    We had an afternoon session where the public could come and visit the owls and see the new maps and take one if they were interested. In the evening we had a speaker who is an expert on owls and falcons. He's a government biologist who worked on the project to bring the peregrine falcon back after the DDT tragedy. His experience is out in the field.

     Now the three owls and male peregrine falcon were on display for the evening session. People were able to touch the birds. All of these birds have been injured and are not candidates to be released into the wild.  Otis, the great horned Owl, is blind. Otis has been around visiting people and making presentations long enough that he has written a couple of kids books.

Otis, great horned owl


barred owl

male peregrine falcon



                                                                                                                                                                                            

    

36 comments:

  1. Hi Red, Very nice work on this project. I wonder if you will put this map online? The owls and falcon are impressive even though captive. Congrats on this post!

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    1. We are working on getting a website going for this map. They are still vigorous birds even though they have limitations.

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    2. Thanks Red. When the website is up I hope you will let us know. Have a good weekend.

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  2. This looks an excellent project. well done to you all.

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    1. Thanks. It was a rewarding project.

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  3. Great work, Red. And those birds are so beautiful!

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    1. We hired a graphic artist.Since people knew where the birds are it was all fit together.

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  4. What a great project. Strangely enough, now that we are without Amy I find great comfort in all the wild birds that seem to visit our garden. I never used to fully appreciate birds - it is something that has developed with age.

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    1. Great that you found birds! I also like getting birds to my yard.

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  5. This sounds like a wonderful organization to belong to. I'm amazed that people can actually touch them.

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    1. It is interesting to be in this group. These birds have been captive for a long time and they are trained to some extent.

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  6. What a nice work to make a map for a birds trail That owl looks really cute. I once saw a real owl here too, he turned his head around so funny to see, he had his eyes on his back.

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    1. We had a highly skilled graphic artist who put this together.

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  7. Congratulations Red on all the work that went into your debut of the Birding Map. I had never heard of "Otis the Owl", but I shall now certainly look him up. Nice job, nice map and like "John's Island" said - will the map be available online. Have a wonderful day.

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    1. We should have a website up shortly. I'm going to have to Google Otis. I've met Otis many times.

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  8. Very nice idea to complete. I like the hard copy best so I can have it with me when I travel.

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    1. With all the phones now people just download the map and away they go.

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  9. I am always so impressed with the organizations that take care of wild creatures who have been injured and cannot return to the wild. I'd love to visit something like this myself, but I think this one is a little bit far for me. :-)

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    1. RdRN does not look after the injured birds. It's a group called Medicine River wildlife Center.( I think it's center???) They've made some ground breaking discovery about treating lost or injured critters.

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  10. What a fascinating group! That is a great project. And those birds are beautiful!

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    1. Birding has become a big tourist attraction.

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  11. wonderful! great work by your group, too!

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    1. Thankyou. It's tough to fight against losing native habitat.

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  12. They're beautiful birds. There's a place not far from where I grew up that had owls and other such birds as educational ambassadors- also birds that were hurt and couldn't be released back into the wild.

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  13. Good job! How fortunate you are to belong to a group that has a vision! Way to go Red and all the other volunteers! Those birds are awesome:)

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    1. Birding has become a great tourist activity.

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  14. Wonderful project- well done, Red! Your group is to be commended. I would love to see an owl up close..I hear barn owls almost every day,but have never seen them.

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  15. I do so love these birds and I am so envious and so glad you have produced such a useful tool. Thanks to your team.

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  16. I worked at the wildlife rehab center at the University of Minnesota for a couple summers and I will never forget the thrill of seeing birds like this up close and holding and feeding them. What a wonderful program you have in Red
    Deer and great job on the city bird list. Red, do you know the Pinno family? Rachel worked in Red Deer at a bank up until a couple years ago and they are dear friends of mine.

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  17. What beautiful birds!! SO glad they are being cared for so well.

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  18. Such a wonderful event! We can teach so much about nature, but appreciation comes with touching their lives.

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  19. Worthwhile and rewarding work Red.

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  20. When I was a kid. I had the barn owl I call it. Fly through my open window in the summer. I was startled.

    I do think they are neat though. How interesting that event.
    And they are all beautiful birds of creature.

    For the first time I actually was able to take the pictures that I did. Of the miniature owl. I sent it to our local newspaper. They thanked me very much. They had one showing of same owl so when I sent it. They were even more excited. I got a free paper next week..

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