Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Ducks But No ducklings

      Last Saturday morning I visited the Michael Obrien Wetlands in town. This is a series of man made ponds. Some pond are about 7 acres and some are smaller and very irregular shapes. It's a great habitat for ducks as the pond edges have a heavy willow and grass edge.

     I was able to get some distant shots of ducks.

A lesser scaup that's trying to ignore me

A couple of mallards putting in time around their nest sites.
  Soon there should be ducklings following parents as the goslings were 

28 comments:

  1. i have wood ducks here - two broods made it to late teens. one tiny batch of whistlers - 3 - down to 2 today...

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    1. Your ducks have a very good supervisor.

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  2. I have seen ducklings already here, some of them were very early in april.

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    1. I'm sure there would be ducklings here but I just haven't seen them.

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  3. Seems like the scaup always turn away when a camera is pointed at them.They are very timid. Lots of geese around here already, but only a few ducklings.They stay closer to the nest.I watched some swan cyngets the other day.

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    1. This guy was far out so he shouldn't have seen me!

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  4. I want to see pictures of the ducklings.

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    1. I'll do my best to get some ducklings.

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  5. I hope that, later, you'll post pictures of the baby ducks.

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    1. I'll do my best to get photos of ducklings.

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  6. Ducklings grow pretty fast because most of them become food.

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    1. Predation rate is extremely high on the little guys.

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  7. Sometimes I wonder if ducks or geese set up their own babysitting services- one might see a whole lot of little ones with one pair, while others are off having a bite to eat.

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    1. If you watch closely the same pair of ducks goes by with a different number most times. We foster ducklings that are lost or lose a parent. We find a duck with ducklings and throw the little guys into the water. They are claimed instantly. It doesn't matter what species of duck.

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  8. Hi Red, I like your reports on birding outings. The Park sounded interesting and I found a link to story about how it was named http://www.reddeeradvocate.com/news/Red_Deer_park_dedicated_to_local_environmentalist.html?

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    1. I first met Michael Obrien in Inuvik NWT in 1964. When I came to Red Deer to teach, Michael had just come to the same school. We spent many good times together.

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  9. I don't know what it is with water fowl but they have a wonderful habit of paddling away whenever we try to take a photo.

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    1. I guess we have to talk to them to get their attention!

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  10. I am pleased that you shot the ducks with a camera and not a rifle.

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    1. My hunting days all long past.

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    2. Are you talking about ducks or women Red?

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  11. It's so fun to watch those little ones paddling after their parents...:)

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    1. I like to watch how they handle the rough water.

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  12. Ducklings are always so adorable! We've seen a few around here. And goslings, too. Those are just as cute!

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  13. It's always lovely to watch the birds. It always slows me right down. Have a wonderful weekend, Red.

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  14. I too like your info on the bird age. And wee ones. Ya!

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