Friday, August 5, 2016

Perspectives

      I was in a classroom teaching before my 19th birthday. I remember very clearly being in a teacher seminar when they were discussing retirement and what the requirements were for full retirement. 

      Now an 18 year old is not going to be able to get his head around retirement. Apparently they were showing teachers a formula that would give them the time when they could retire on full pension. I remember the numbers I got when I used the formula. It was 1958 and I would qualify for full retirement in 1995. Now for an 18 year old kid  in 1958 , 1995 was an impossibly long way off. It was something I could not wrap my head around. I was too busy having fun at the moment.

     Well, time moved on. In fact, time moved on very quickly and 1995 did occur. As time was moving on I seldom thought about retirement. I was too busy. The teaching load was heavy. I was involved with professional development for teachers. I went to every conference I could find. I even went to a conference in Washington D.C. in 1992.

    I did not qualify for full retirement in 1995 but finally retired in 1997. 

    Now time really flies! I've been retired for 19 years. Looking back to the start of retirement seems like yesterday. Looking back to when I was 18 seems like an unbelievably long time ago. It was. It was a very different time. 

     Who could have imagined that when I retired the world would be so much different. Technology changed things. The economy changed our economic status. I taught through the best of times as far as the economy was concerned. 

     I've been fortunate to have a pension and to have defined benefits. What did I know about this as an 18 year old? 

     I  wish that 18 year olds today could look ahead and see the same opportunities that I had.

    So perspectives give one a different point of view.

    Here I am as an 18 year old with my first class. 

    Here I am in the summer of 2016 ...58 years apart.

38 comments:

  1. We are the lucky generation, had jobs in a peaceful country, didn't have to worry about loosing jobs or money and retired at a reasonable age to have a second life as an eldery. Enough money to travel around the world and give your children a good education. Sometimes I think we lived in paradise as I see the world changing now.

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    1. We certainly did live in the best of times. You summed it up exactly. It's too bad we could not leave our children with the same opportunities.

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  2. Ah! What memories. And 'She who knows Best!" I didn't start teaching until late, as I had kids. Seriously, I took a huge penalty for retiring early, but I burned out and burned up. So many mistakes. I wish someone had taken me under their wing and talked to me. sigh.
    I was involved in PD, as well. I found it the most enjoyable. I don't know how my friends, still teaching, have stuck with it.

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    1. I've said before that women pay a big price when it comes to professional opportunity. I don't remember any advice. It's lacking in our profession. PD is what kept me going. I learned things and it motivated me. Yes, it's much harder in the profession today. I must admit that I was burned out when I retired.

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  3. Oh, Red, you are also a wise man these days. And what I treasure you are to me, one of your devoted readers. I am also amazed at how quickly my eight years since retirement have flown by. :-)

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    1. It's good that you used the term "thee days." I didn't get it together until my 40's. I always look forward to the heavy post on Sundays.

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  4. So nice to read your post Red!And thank you soo kindly for nice words at my place..i wish you two all good :)))

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  5. Among my concerns for the future is people do not understand the urgency of preparing everyday of their working lives for their retirement days. Now that people are living longer it's even more important.

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    1. People aren't preparing and there's not much they can do to prepare. My son will have to work until the day he dies. He has no pension and no investments of savings.

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  6. A friend has been retired longer than he worked this year. He is 93.

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    1. That can happen. we live much longer.

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  7. Quite a different world from then and now, Red.

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    1. Yes, I lived through the best of times.

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  8. a career and then some summed up in one post. you're right about the 18 yos today not having quite the same outlook anymore - with pensions, retirement opportunities, careers...

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    1. I can say that when I was 18 I was the same as 18 year olds today. I may have been teaching but I was still immature.

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  9. You were a rather mature looking eighteen year old. When I was eighteen I looked like a bespectacled, unkempt Soviet dissident.

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    1. It's that old baggy clothing that does it. Trust me I was the typical immature teenager even though I was teaching.

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  10. Times were certainly different then. The company where my husband works used to include a wonderful pension plan; lucky for him he joined at that time because they don't offer that anymore, or as many benefits. Now the motto seems to be 'more profit for the company and less incentive for the worker'. It's no wonder there is such a high turnover at that place. The upcoming generation may have more struggles.

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    1. I think thee will have to be some major economic shifts for our children to have some retirement.

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  11. Great post Red, yes a different world. Loved the photos, especially the one of your dear lady. The old one with your students is very nice.

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    1. I guess when you look at it things change and we don't notice it.

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  12. Congratulations on your teaching career! I think teachers deserve all the benefits they get and more. Yes, when I started my current job at age 26, retirement seemed a long ways off. Now I'm three years away and it doesn't seem possible!

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    1. Only childhood time seems to drag. The rest of our life flashes by.

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  13. That is a great old photo! It is also nice to see your gal who keeps you on the straight and narrow! Yes we all grow old and feel lucky to eek by in retirement! :)

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    1. Yes we are fortunate. We lived and worked in the best of times.

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  14. I often give thanks that I grew up and worked in the times that I did. I'm sure it was the best of times.

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  15. Defined pensions are a wonderful thing. We have them too and they make our retirement very comfortable Unfortunately defined pensions are going away. I fear for what will happen when our younger people reach age.

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  16. Years ago one of my sons (who has been dead for 10 years!) said "Dad, your generation has had the best of times in many ways: the final salary pension that allows you to live so well being one thing that those of us starting out now will never have." He was so right.

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  17. Wow that B&W picture of 18 year old is priceless.
    Yes we have no time to think of the future, but it soon catches up.

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  18. You done good...well. congratulations on your perspective.

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  19. You have lived a good life Red - a decent life of service and you thoroughly earned your comfortable retirement. But I worry about the eighteen year olds of today. What can they expect when they reach sixty or sixty five? There is such financial turbulence and uncertainty in today's world. Nice to see you with the famous "Micro Manager". She looks happy with her patient.

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  20. It's funny how time telescopes as we get older. It just gets faster and faster, doesn't it?! And yeah, kids never grasp all that retirement stuff. I remember employers telling me about a pension and blah blah blah and it was in one ear and out the other.

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  21. Great story on pespectives, Red!! Similar to my dad's :) He retired from a government bank as an officer and is now earning a govt pension too. I loved your pictures.

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  22. Fun photos to see ... Then and Now. It's surprising you could teach so young, obviously without a degree. You must have chosen the right career because it seems you enjoyed it very much.

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  23. I think our teaching to retirement stories are quite similar, Red. Of course at such a you age (I was 21 when I started) one believes one is immortal and live and thinks like it...:)

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  24. Oh the world of today is pretty slim for kids out of University to get full time jobs. Yes our generation was hard but we worked hard. Sometimes I look at the teens today and do they really want to work in summer jobs. Most of them live off Mom and dad. Go on trips, so to the beach, party relax. Ask them to cut grass or trim trees as helping the parents. Are you kidding. What is that?

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  25. Hi Red, You said, "Now time really flies! I've been retired for 19 years. Looking back to the start of retirement seems like yesterday. Looking back to when I was 18 seems like an unbelievably long time ago. It was. It was a very different time." If you will make just one change to that sentence I would be perfect for me ... the 19 is 18 for me. So, we are in just about the same boat. Everything you said here is so true. Thanks for another great post. I really enjoy your reflections on teaching.

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