Wednesday, June 24, 2020

MESSAGE FROM THE HAND

      Mr Pudding, from Yorkshire Pudding, makes some interesting comments. He can be humorous, witty, serious , and very much on topic. Sometimes he will pick up on one small detail and make his comment on a small part of your post. He doesn't care if he uses some imagination. If there's something he doesn't know or care about, he doesn't make a comment for the sake of making a comment.

     Mr Pudding made a comment on my last post that made me think of many more things about my post on my Dad.

     On the post I was trying to show my Dad and myself in two different phases of our lives.

   On the second photo Mr Pudding facetiously suggested that I had a fist behind my Dad and that I wanted money.

    My Dad was not a wealthy man. He donated much to Christian causes that he supported. He really didn't care if he had the money or not, he would make a donation. He was confident that he would be looked after.

    Dad was also generous in other ways. Dad had the idea that his farm would be somehow taxed if it was left in his estate. What did he do? He distributed his land equally to his sons before he turned 65. I said, "Dad , you will need income from the farm to survive. " He wouldn't listen. He had CPP (Canada pension plan) and Oas (old age security) and he would survive . He bought some property and was lucky that the time he had the property as it increased in value. He spent 15 winters in Phoenix. He rented the same old house for 15 years.

   Now he only had one financial goal. He wanted enough money to pay for his funeral. And he did have enough for a funeral and $1600.00 left over.

   Now for the fist behind my Dad? I think I had my thumb sticking in my pocket and Graham from Eagleton Notes agrees with me. Take a look at my photo in my post Father's Day

   So the comment from Mr Pudding made me think of much more on my Dad.

37 comments:

  1. Yes thumb in your pocket, my husband does the same thing:)

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    1. I really didn't notice that I put thumbs in my pocket.

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  2. I went back and looked at the picture again. I think you and Graham are correct and you simply had your thumb in your pocket. I've seen others stand like that too. However, if YP's remark made you spend a bit more time thinking about your Dad then maybe that was a good thing. And now we also got to learn a little more about your Dad!

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    1. I was trying to point out just how comments work sometimes.

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  3. Hello, it is nice to read about your generous Dad. My mother and father were far from wealthy, but they would be the first to help someone else. I saw the photo, it does look like our thumb is hooked into your pocket. Have a great day!

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    1. I think people were more generous with less in my Dad's generation.

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  4. What a unique perspective on life.

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  5. Your dad did what I’d like to do, divest myself of all but the essentials and leave little behind for my child to take care of. Wise man...

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    1. Dad was the type of person who could get away with this one. When he was in Phoenix he sometimes built fences which of course was against the law.

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  6. I'll have to go take a look. I did read the post but now I'm curious. :-)

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    1. I guess what I'm saying is that a good comment makes us think about things .

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  7. Interesting to read this, we only need so much money

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    1. The challenge is to know how much we need.

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  8. I loved reading these details about your father's life. He really did plan ahead so well. A lovely look back with details.

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    1. Here we have some programs that offer assistance to elderly and he made use of some of that.

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  9. It's interesting how another's comments -- even if made for humor's sake -- can help us think about things more deeply!

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  10. I think your dad's thinking (to have enough money to pay for his funeral) was more common in that generation. He did well to accomplish that.

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    1. You're right that the funeral was very important to them.

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  11. What a wise man your dad was, nice memory!

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  12. I'm glad that you, too, think that you had your thumb in your pocket.

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    1. It's always nice to get one on Mr. Pudding.

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    2. It's not fair! I will tell The Micro Manager on you you beast!

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  13. I've always been fascinated by that generation's attachment to land. It had to be retained.

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    1. I think the family land ownership is just about over.Families cannot afford such large amounts of land.

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  14. Your Dad was a good dad that's for sure. I like to make a comment no matter how short, just to let blogging friends know I am still enjoying their blog. This is unless I am on my iPAD upstairs which won't let me make comments on many, so I look and wait until the morning before I go back. It's hard to keep up with the many good folks I know online, but I get there eventually. It is always a very enjoyable part of my day.

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  15. A comment, a sight, a sound can have me drifting away to memory land any old time. Good to hear about your father. My Dad was the same generation with the same generous nature although he had little to give except his time and energy but he gave plenty of that. I remember my mother being annoyed that, in his 70s, he was mowing the lawn for a young solo mother with two little children and then not sleeping from the pain in his hips. We were blessed to have such good fathers.

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  16. I am pleased that my mischievous comment caused you to reflect a little more upon your father. Sounds like he was a good, hardworking man - the very backbone of the Canadian dream.

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  17. It’s strange what people will see in any photo, so I had to look at the previous post and didn’t suspect anything unusual.

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  18. I once read the story of a man who left just a few dollars behind when he passed away and his family, who were telling the story, said it was God's perfect provision. At the time I thought they were nuts but these days I'd have to agree.
    Im not sure how you view it but to me your reflections on his financial affairs are evidence of an active and living faith

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  19. Your Dad sounds like a wonderful caring man, and you must be a lot like him.

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  20. What an amazing man he was, Red. I’m sorry he had to suffer toward the end of his life.

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