Sunday, May 2, 2021

TRANSPORTATION II

     In my last post I mentioned that we got 90% or more of our freight by ship. That usually meant that two ships per year called. But sometimes we had 3 or 4 ships call in one summer. 

    One summer an icebreaker , the D'Iberville, showed up to sound the end of the  bay.



        Wakeham Bay was 24 miles deep. A mining company was working on a mining project 60 miles inland. Their proposal was to build a dock at the end of the bay and haul the ore out over the year and have ships pick the ore up and take it to refineries 

    I'm not sure that this project ever happened.

    But what did happen is that we were invited out to the ship to have dinner with the captain. Horror of horrors! I was on the same level as the captain.  It didn't matter that I was a village administrator and he was a ship captain we were supposedly equals. That has hard to get through a prairie boy's head where everybody was equal. I had never experienced status before. 

    They sent a helicopter to pick us up. As we flew out to the ship we saw five belugas swimming in the bay. 

     I still remember looking at the ship from  distance and how small it looked. when we got closer I saw the circles on deck where we were to land. the circles looked smaller than ever. 

     We had a fine dinner with the very formal old captain and then they took us back home by helicopter. 

      Approaching the settlement by helicopter. It really was a very small place.



     And don't worry I did not let my dinner with the captain go to my head. I still look as people as people rather than what title they are given. 

40 comments:

  1. What an exciting experience that must have been for you both. I am amazed at the picture of the settlement from the helicopter. It really was a very small community.

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    1. There were roughly 200 people in 67.

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  2. In your two years at Wakeham Bay did you ever see an igloo? I have the idea that eskimos building igloos is just something that belongs in cartoons. The settlement did look so tiny from the air didn't it?

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    1. Yes, igloos were built and used when they wee travelling or hunting. I'll never forget when they showed us how to build an igloo. Remember that this was 67. the other teacher build an igloo. the test of a good igloo was to be able to stand on top of it. He did stand on top of his igloo.

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  3. That is quite an experience, flying in a helicopter and have a captain's
    dinner!

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    1. It was something that I could never have imagined.

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  4. Hello,
    A helicopter ride to dinner sounds exciting. I would have loved seeing the beluga whale. Take care, have a happy new week!

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    1. I had seen belugas on the water but never from a helicopter.

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  5. You were exalted in more than one way considering the airlift.

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  6. Once you mentioned belugas, the song Baby Beluga started playing in my head.

    What a great adventure, helicopter, lunch with the captain.

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    1. Now I'm going to have to look that song up. I've never heard of it.

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  7. This is so neat to see all these memories of yours come to life. Thank you for sharing these, Red.

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    1. Sometimes it's stuff I had totally forgotten about.

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  8. I like that world. In my world, people rank themselves by importance, and since my view of things is rather the same as yours, I give unintentional offense by my lack of deference. It's a strange thing. At 63, you'd think that I'd have figured it out. I'm better off as an amiable hermit, really.

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  9. What an interesting experience. I love that you photographed the journey from the helicopter. The photo of the village really does capture how small it was.

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    1. There wee about 200 people and the houses wee incredibly small.

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  10. What adventures you have had!

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  11. Loved your photos of the experience. I would have been too afraid to look down, I think! Glad you didn't let it go to your head and you can still hang out with us! LOL!
    My SIL and BIL lived in Bethel, Alaska for quite a while and I remember when they bought a truck that had to be delivered by barge to them. The delivery cost more than the truck!

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    1. The north brings about some strange situations. I have no problem looking down from and airplane but some from balconies I have stress.

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  12. Just catching up on your blog! What an amazing life you've led. So many interesting stories.

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    1. I have been fortunate. I could have stayed in the house there and seen and done nothing.

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  13. What a great experience and memory to have.

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    1. I'm sure you can identify with lots of this.

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  14. In my experience, people who always think of themselves as equals, rarely think otherwise even when given a temporary status change.

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    1. I was a teacher. Nuff said! I did try in some way to work together as I would say "Let's. "

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  15. It is tiny, isn't it. And comforting to look at.

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    1. We had about 200 people. The isolation is the hard thing to get your head around. We never felt lonely.

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  16. Replies
    1. I'd do it over again in a heart beat.

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  17. What a great post to come back to from my absence. That was one of the things I discovered when I came to live on Lewis 45 years ago: titles meant little compared with where I had come from. Status came more from age and the respect you earned.

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    1. I think we accomplish more when everybody can pitch in and be rewarded.

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  18. What a treat! You have had many adventures in your years in the north and I enjoy reading about them.

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    1. I could have stayed in the house and done nothing! Not us. We got out there.

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  19. I have enjoyed reading about this latest experience of yours Red. What an adventure that must have been.

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  20. Hi Red, Can't believe how small that settlement was. Interesting! Great story about dinner with the Captain.

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  21. What an experience! The Village looks quite small:)

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